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Starbucks Corp is laying off about 350 global corporate employees, Chief Executive Officer Kevin Johnson said on Tuesday in a memo to employees, seen by Reuters.

The elimination of the non-store employees is part of a restructuring plan that Johnson unveiled in September in an attempt to make the company nimble enough to tackle rivals in a fiercely competitive U.S. coffee market.

“Every single decision was made after very careful consideration… And while incredibly difficult, they came as a result of work that has been eliminated, deprioritised or shifting ways of working within the company,” Johnson wrote in the memo.

The layoffs would primarily affect employees at its Seattle Support Center, the memo said. The Wall Street Journal first reported the layoffs.

Creating workforce for future factories: A skilled workforce is a key element for the adoption of Manufacturing 4.0
From mechanisation to electrification to automation, industrial revolutions over the centuries have brought about major technological developments in the world.
We are now witnessing the fourth industrial revolution, Industry 4.0, which is taking technology adoption in manufacturing to a whole new level.
The auto industry has been one of the first adopters of the latest manufacturing trends, making it incumbent to participate in high-end automation of the entire manufacturing value chain, or Manufacturing 4.0.
In India, the adoption of Manufacturing 4.0 is at a nascent stage.
The industrial sector is an integral part of ‘Make in India’. Skilling is the most critical and complex component of manufacturing transition; a skilled workforce forms a key element for the adoption of Manufacturing 4.0.
Integrating technologies like AI, cyber-physical systems and cloud computing into a seamless stream of actionable intelligence, the Internet of Things, is the nerve centre of modern manufacturing.
While enabling deployment of ‘smart machines’ with varying degrees of autonomy, the present-day workforce has to be retrained to fill the new roles these changes create
Kazuhiko Moriyama is betting that well-rested workers are good for business. In fact, he’s placing real money on the wager.
Employees who sleep at least six hours a night, for at least five days a week, are awarded points by Crazy Inc., a wedding organizer in Japan.
The points can be exchanged for food in the company cafeteria worth as much as 64,000 yen ($570) per year. Nightly rest will be tracked using an app made by Airweave Inc., a mattress manufacturer. More than 92 percent of Japanese over the age of 20 say that they aren’t getting enough sleep, according to a survey by Fuji Ryoki, a health-products maker.
Thanks to a labor shortage and long-held cultural belief of noble sacrifice for the corporate good, Japan has become notorious for a phenomenon called death-from-overwork, which claimed the life of an ad agency employee in 2015.
Employees with happier lives will lead to better performance at the office, according to Moriyama. “You have to protect workers’ rights, otherwise the country itself will weaken,” Moriyama said. In addition to the sleep incentives, Crazy also promotes better nutrition, exercise and a more positive office environment.
Child support is available, as well the opportunity to take company vacations on regular business days. Recommended By Colombia There’s some evidence that more sleep will lead to improved business performance and higher economic growth. Insufficient sleep costs the U.S. economy as much as $411 billion a year, or 2.28 percent of GDP, according to a 2009 study by Rand Corp. For Japan, the loss is estimated to be $138 billion, or 2.92 percent of GDP.

Shalini Bharat succeeds S. Parasuraman as director-TISS

Professor Shalini Bharat is the new director of the Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS). She had been the acting director since S. Parasuraman, her predecessor, resigned earlier this year.

Bharat has been working with TISS for more than three decades now. A gold medallist in MA and a PhD holder from Allahabad University, Bharat joined as a lecturer in 1984, and went on to become the first dean of the School of Health Systems Studies. Later, she was elevated to the role of deputy director (academic), and then given the additional charge of acting director in February.

A member of the governing body of the Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI), Bharat has also served as the National Coordinator of Global Fund Project – Saksham. She is also known for her association with the National Rural Health Mission and her presence on the governing board of the National Health Systems Resource Centre, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare.

S. Ramadorai, chairman of the governing board, TISS, said, “I am happy to welcome Prof. Bharat as director. As TISS gears up to cement its position as an institution of excellence in higher education, I am sure that Prof. Bharat, who brings with her a wealth of experience and vision, will take the initiative and ensure that TISS meets the challenges with passion and commitment.”

Increasing wages in China may benefit Indian toy industry: DIPP report

Over the last three to four years, the Chinese market has seen labour strikes in some of its major factories, which resulted in shrinkage in its workforce. The demand in wages has been another call by the Chinese workforce. Economists say that China is trying to rebalance its economy. One of its aims is to reduce dependence on exports and increase the share of consumption. John Baby, chief executive officer (CEO) at Funskool, says that a shrinking workforce and rising wages in China is likely to benefit the toy manufacturing industry in India. “I think there is an opportunity for India as China is not encouraging more labourers,” he adds. Sujan Hajra, chief economist, co-head research at Anand Rathi Securities, said, “China does not want polluting industries and exports relating to that. If labour costs increase, then obviously in an intensive industry like toys, it won’t be able to compete and China is trying to vacate that space. It is totally right that an increase in labour costs in China could help the Indian toy industry.

Hotter weather threatens productivity of Indian workers, says study; temperature rise also increases absenteeism
For every 1 degree Celsius increase in temperature above 27 degree Celsius on a hot day in India, productivity of workers declines by as much as 4 percent, according to a new study.  Annual average temperature in India has increased 2 degree Celsius over 200 years to 2006, and is predicted to rise further by 1.5-2.0 degree Celsius by 2030. Simply put, this means if a worker is packing 100 boxes of shoes in a day at 27 degree Celsius, he/she will pack only 96 boxes on a day when temperature is 28 degree Celsius. Small industries such as cloth-weaving units, which cannot afford air-conditioning, are most vulnerable to production losses due to rise in temperature, as per the 30 August, 2018, study prepared by the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago (EPIC), a think-tank. Workers of “hotter regions” such as Delhi and Gujarat – together contributing about 10 percent of the country’s gross domestic product (on prices of 2014-15) – are likely to see a 4 percent decline in the productivity on a hot day against a 2 percent decline in the efficiency of the workers in “milder climate” of South and Central India, according to the study. Researchers looked at both labour-intensive and highly automated manufacturing processes. In the first category, they found that the productivity of workers engaged in cloth weaving or garment manufacturing dropped by as much as 4 percent per degree as temperatures rose above 27 degree Celsius, as per the study

Hotter weather threatens productivity of Indian workers, says study; temperature rise also increases absenteeism
For every 1 degree Celsius increase in temperature above 27 degree Celsius on a hot day in India, productivity of workers declines by as much as 4 percent, according to a new study.  Annual average temperature in India has increased 2 degree Celsius over 200 years to 2006, and is predicted to rise further by 1.5-2.0 degree Celsius by 2030. Simply put, this means if a worker is packing 100 boxes of shoes in a day at 27 degree Celsius, he/she will pack only 96 boxes on a day when temperature is 28 degree Celsius. Small industries such as cloth-weaving units, which cannot afford air-conditioning, are most vulnerable to production losses due to rise in temperature, as per the 30 August, 2018, study prepared by the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago (EPIC), a think-tank. Workers of “hotter regions” such as Delhi and Gujarat – together contributing about 10 percent of the country’s gross domestic product (on prices of 2014-15) – are likely to see a 4 percent decline in the productivity on a hot day against a 2 percent decline in the efficiency of the workers in “milder climate” of South and Central India, according to the study. Researchers looked at both labour-intensive and highly automated manufacturing processes. In the first category, they found that the productivity of workers engaged in cloth weaving or garment manufacturing dropped by as much as 4 percent per degree as temperatures rose above 27 degree Celsius, as per the study