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How CHROs manage senior-level exits

CHROs are bouncing back with successful succession planning after the company experience senior level exits.

How CHROs manage senior-level exitsWhen a senior leader from the top management decides to put an end to the relationship with the organization it comes as a shock for several reasons. The shock can be heart-wrenching because this will not only impact the relationship with their clients and also the brand images that he helped build in the industry.

While the company has to move on following the departure the process behind making everything normal goes through a rough phase. This puts a lot of pressure on the HR Head to sail through the transition period and do the damage control.

And there are other implications of key executives moving out of organization. If the company is publically listed it’s likely to fall flat on the stock exchange immediately. This might also mean some of his loyal members in the organization may tag along with the boss and join his next company.

Sharing his thought about the impact, Sandeep Tyagi, Director, Human Resources, Samsung, states in scenarios like this succession planning plays a key role. The organization needs to be strong when it comes to people processes or policies.

“To succeed, every company should consolidate their talent pipeline. Due to such processes, large organizations are growing, and they have thousands of employees. Promoters and owners of big corporate houses don’t sit in all the branches, but managers operate these companies,” Tyagi argues.

HR’s Job

Industry experts believe that these things do matter, but it depends upon the culture of the company on how they deal with it. If they are not internally strong, it’ll take time for the organization to bounce back. But now a days company strategize in advance for any such mishap.

Great HR’s have a knack for keeping their employees so satisfied they rarely want to leave. But, even then the HR heads experience a departing team member at some point in time, and when essential people quit, they understand that the team day to day operations is likely to disrupt.

These exits do create tremors in the company, but the fact can’t be ignored that most of the exits are planned transition because the person will serve the notice and then move on.

“The real problem comes when an unplanned situation arrives what we call in the HR fraternity termed it as ‘hit by a truck.’ In such cases the organization has to re-aligned the company,” said, Vipul Dave, Head HR, Cosmo Films.

Dave also mentioned that these situations could be easily handled if the organization has done the succession planning way in advance.

Bounce Back

According to the industry leaders, the leadership transition and movement will happen, but the question arrives how agile your organization is? People are going to quit, but one has to check the risk status of the company and find out if the employees are high or low at risk.

Key leadership exits add a dent in the company, but at the same time, it depends on the company’s bouncing back capability and how quickly the organization realign the process and maintain everything back to normal.

Magic Bricks CHRO, Anil Kumar Misra feels such situations do impact the company, but one needs to find out different solutions for different people because one solution doesn’t fit all.

When asked, if he tries to convince the outgoing employees? He replied, “There is no fun in retaining somebody who is hell-bent to move out.”

Today, a lot of multinationals are investing in the process for the organization and not only play with star players or else they will collapse. Companies are moving away from the individual-centric mindset to avoid such incident.

Organizations do feel they prepared are they for such scenario, but still, some of the exits cost them at a very high level. Exits will always be there, but companies need to build an internal shield that protects them from huge impacts such as mass exit, fall of share prices, revenues and brand name

Creating workforce for future factories: A skilled workforce is a key element for the adoption of Manufacturing 4.0
From mechanisation to electrification to automation, industrial revolutions over the centuries have brought about major technological developments in the world.
We are now witnessing the fourth industrial revolution, Industry 4.0, which is taking technology adoption in manufacturing to a whole new level.
The auto industry has been one of the first adopters of the latest manufacturing trends, making it incumbent to participate in high-end automation of the entire manufacturing value chain, or Manufacturing 4.0.
In India, the adoption of Manufacturing 4.0 is at a nascent stage.
The industrial sector is an integral part of ‘Make in India’. Skilling is the most critical and complex component of manufacturing transition; a skilled workforce forms a key element for the adoption of Manufacturing 4.0.
Integrating technologies like AI, cyber-physical systems and cloud computing into a seamless stream of actionable intelligence, the Internet of Things, is the nerve centre of modern manufacturing.
While enabling deployment of ‘smart machines’ with varying degrees of autonomy, the present-day workforce has to be retrained to fill the new roles these changes create
Sasken Technologies make changes in the leadership team with the appointment of new Chief People Officer and VP and Head of its Automotive Business.

Sasken Technologies appoint its new Chief People Officer

Sasken Technologies has appointed Vinita Shrivastava as the Chief People Officer (CPO).

On her appointment, Shrivastava shared,  “Sasken is at an inflection point, poised for significant growth. I am excited to part of Sasken’s 5×5 vision and see immense potential to leverage the talent pool and leadership team’s strength.”

Shrivastava is a seasoned HR Leader with over 24 years of industry experience.  Vinita started her career in HR with HCL Technologies and worked there for about nine years. After HCL she has worked with companies like Tesco and Harman International Industries.

Educated in Management at Cornell University, USA and Bhopal University, India, Vinita is a National scholarship holder for Graduation. She was awarded “Woman Super Achiever” award in 2010-2011 by the Employer Branding Institute, and “Women at Work Leadership” award by the World HRD Congress in February 2012.

Additionally, Sasken Technologies has also announced the appointment of Calvin Nichols as VP and Head of its Automotive Business to lead the company’s efforts in the Automotive Segment.

Shalini Bharat succeeds S. Parasuraman as director-TISS

Professor Shalini Bharat is the new director of the Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS). She had been the acting director since S. Parasuraman, her predecessor, resigned earlier this year.

Bharat has been working with TISS for more than three decades now. A gold medallist in MA and a PhD holder from Allahabad University, Bharat joined as a lecturer in 1984, and went on to become the first dean of the School of Health Systems Studies. Later, she was elevated to the role of deputy director (academic), and then given the additional charge of acting director in February.

A member of the governing body of the Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI), Bharat has also served as the National Coordinator of Global Fund Project – Saksham. She is also known for her association with the National Rural Health Mission and her presence on the governing board of the National Health Systems Resource Centre, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare.

S. Ramadorai, chairman of the governing board, TISS, said, “I am happy to welcome Prof. Bharat as director. As TISS gears up to cement its position as an institution of excellence in higher education, I am sure that Prof. Bharat, who brings with her a wealth of experience and vision, will take the initiative and ensure that TISS meets the challenges with passion and commitment.”

Role of corporate training in the retail sector
India is the 5th largest destination in retail space and is expected to grow at US $950 billion by 2018. This sector has witnessed a rapid growth in implementation of employee training programmes as front-line associates have a major and immediate influence over consumers’ buying decisions. For example, in a shopping complex, the sales staff is the biggest stimulus for the customer’s purchase decisions, hence their communication skills, soft skills, knowledge about the product etc. are an important concern. It becomes crucial to pay close attention to the way retail workforce interacts with customers and closes the sales transactions. Training ensures that the workforce structure of an organization remains strong. Training requires a substantial percentage of expenditure by company which seems like a huge expense at start but is proved to be profitable in the long run. Employees who are well informed and have access to training materials, as and when they require, are typically happier. Retail is well known for its high turnover rates and one of the benefits of training in the sector is that it can help increase employee retention rate by giving them the knowledge and skills they need to fulfill their job responsibilities

Hotter weather threatens productivity of Indian workers, says study; temperature rise also increases absenteeism
For every 1 degree Celsius increase in temperature above 27 degree Celsius on a hot day in India, productivity of workers declines by as much as 4 percent, according to a new study.  Annual average temperature in India has increased 2 degree Celsius over 200 years to 2006, and is predicted to rise further by 1.5-2.0 degree Celsius by 2030. Simply put, this means if a worker is packing 100 boxes of shoes in a day at 27 degree Celsius, he/she will pack only 96 boxes on a day when temperature is 28 degree Celsius. Small industries such as cloth-weaving units, which cannot afford air-conditioning, are most vulnerable to production losses due to rise in temperature, as per the 30 August, 2018, study prepared by the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago (EPIC), a think-tank. Workers of “hotter regions” such as Delhi and Gujarat – together contributing about 10 percent of the country’s gross domestic product (on prices of 2014-15) – are likely to see a 4 percent decline in the productivity on a hot day against a 2 percent decline in the efficiency of the workers in “milder climate” of South and Central India, according to the study. Researchers looked at both labour-intensive and highly automated manufacturing processes. In the first category, they found that the productivity of workers engaged in cloth weaving or garment manufacturing dropped by as much as 4 percent per degree as temperatures rose above 27 degree Celsius, as per the study

Hotter weather threatens productivity of Indian workers, says study; temperature rise also increases absenteeism
For every 1 degree Celsius increase in temperature above 27 degree Celsius on a hot day in India, productivity of workers declines by as much as 4 percent, according to a new study.  Annual average temperature in India has increased 2 degree Celsius over 200 years to 2006, and is predicted to rise further by 1.5-2.0 degree Celsius by 2030. Simply put, this means if a worker is packing 100 boxes of shoes in a day at 27 degree Celsius, he/she will pack only 96 boxes on a day when temperature is 28 degree Celsius. Small industries such as cloth-weaving units, which cannot afford air-conditioning, are most vulnerable to production losses due to rise in temperature, as per the 30 August, 2018, study prepared by the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago (EPIC), a think-tank. Workers of “hotter regions” such as Delhi and Gujarat – together contributing about 10 percent of the country’s gross domestic product (on prices of 2014-15) – are likely to see a 4 percent decline in the productivity on a hot day against a 2 percent decline in the efficiency of the workers in “milder climate” of South and Central India, according to the study. Researchers looked at both labour-intensive and highly automated manufacturing processes. In the first category, they found that the productivity of workers engaged in cloth weaving or garment manufacturing dropped by as much as 4 percent per degree as temperatures rose above 27 degree Celsius, as per the study